greenman do for + noun

The construction do for + noun is like saying "manage" or "contrive" . It is most commonly used in questions.

 

E.g.

How are we doing for time— ¿Cómo vamos de tiempo?

What did you do for work— ¿Qué hiciste para trabajar?

How are you doing for money— ¿Cómo andas de dinero?

We are doing alright for fuel at the moment — Vamos bien de gasolina por ahora

 

Use In Articles

-Welcome to Canada

greenman(a) say

The word say, when used as a noun, means "an opinion or input in a matter".

 

E.g.

You have no say in this matter— No tienes ni voz ni voto en este asunto

Children have some say when it comes to buying a car— La opinión de los niños se tiene en cuenta a la hora de comprar un coche

You've had your say; now be quiet! — Has dado tu opinión; ahora cállate

greenmanSeeing as

In spoken English especially, the conjunction seeing as is very commonly used instead of since or "in view of the fact that".

 

E.g.

Seeing as you paid for the last round, I'll get this one— Ya que pagaste la última ronda, yo te invito esta vez

It's too soon for thumbs-up selfies, seeing as it only happened 70 years ago—Es demasiado pronto para selfies con el pulgar levantado, visto que sucedió hace solo 70 años

 

greenmanTake it upon oneself to

This expression means: "to take on the responsibility for something without consulting or being asked to." 

E.g

He took it upon himself to call my lawyer— Se encargó de llamar a mi abogado sin consultarme

I took it upon myself to prepare the report while you were away— Por mi propia iniciativa preparé el informe mientras estabas fuera

The NSA took it upon themselves to expand the security programme— La NSA se encargó de expandir el programa de seguridad por su cuenta (sin que se les pidiera)

 

 

greenman get one up/over on (somebody)

The expressions get one up on or get one over on both have similar meanings. There are several derivative forms, such as the verb to one-up or as a noun - one-upmanship.1 

1. to show or prove that you are better than someone else

2. to gain an advantage over someone 

 

E.g.

He got one up on his workmate by handing in his report a day early — Se apuntó un tanto más que su compañero de trabajo al entregar el informe un día antes

You got one over on me last night when you drank more than I could — Me superaste anoche bebiendo más que yo

I one-upped the competition — Le he sacado ventaja a la competencia

Trump uses the handshake as part of his one-upmanship — Trump utiliza el apretón de manos como parte de su estrategia para colocarse en una situación de superioridad

 

In The Press

Mr Corbyn merely smiled the enigmatic smile of a man who has got one over on the crowd. Over the next few days he may reveal more secrets. Mirror.co.uk-Feb 8, 2017

“Jay will feel she's got one over on her old enemy in taking Bake Off from under her nose. She and Channel 4 are delighted with their coup.” The Sun-Sep 16, 2016

He's known as the joker of the royal family, but a young boy got one up on Prince Harry yesterday when the Queen's grandson tried to prank him.  Daily Mail-Feb 2, 2017

Why dealmaker Trump won't get one up on Abe's yen policy CNBC-Feb 6, 2017

 

In DualTexts Articles

-Smart Drugs

-The Archers Podcast

-Trump Handshake

greenmanStretch (of the imagination)

A stretch is something that goes beyond a normal limit, or an exaggeration. It's commonly used in the phrase it's no stretch (of the imagination) to +verb. The expression by no stretch of the imagination is also common and means that something cannot be true, no matter how hard you try to imagine it.

 

E.g.

It's no stretch to say that this hotel is the best in Spain- No es ninguna exageración decir que este hotel es el mejor de España

It's no stretch of the imagination to think that he could be guilty- No es muy difícil imaginar que podría ser culpable

By no stretch of the imagination could you call him an writer- Bajo ningún concepto se le podría llamar escritor

greenmanThat is

This expression is often translated as es decir or o sea.  However, it is also used to explain or correct something previously said, and it has a slightly different meaning.

 

E.g.

I felt very tired this morning. That is, until I had my first coffee— Me sentía muy cansado esta mañana. Eso sí, hasta que tomé mi primer café

I plan to buy a yacht when I retire. That is, if I am still alive— Pienso comprarme un yate cuando me jubile. Eso es si aún estoy vivo

Bolt looked like he was going to win the race. Until he slipped and fell, that is— Parecía que Bolt iba a ganar la carrera. Hasta que se resbaló y se cayó, claro.